Caraway Seeds

Regency Caraway is another member of the group of aromatic, umbelliferous plants characterized by carminative properties, like Anise, Cumin, Dill and Fennel. It is grown, however, less for the medicinal properties of the fruits, or so-called ‘seeds,’ than for their use as a flavouring in cookery, confectionery and liqueurs. Both fruit and oil possess aromatic, stimulant and carminative properties.

Cultivation: Preparation for Market – Caraway does best when the seeds are sown inthe autumn, as soon as ripe, though they may be sown in March. Sow in drills, 1 foot apart, the plants when strong enough, being thinned out to about 8 inches in the rows. The ground will require an occasional hoeing to keep it clean and assist the growth of the plants. From an autumn-sown crop, seeds will be produced in the following summer, ripening about August. When the fruit ripens, the plant is cut and the Caraways are separated by threshing. They can be dried either on trays in the sun, or by very gentle heat over a stove, shaking occasionally.

CarawaySeeds

Specifications:

  • Appearance: Clean, sound quality suitable for human consumption
  • Normal colour, smell and taste
  • Practically free from mould, rancid taste and foreign matters, flavour and aroma
  • Free from living insects and mites
  • Can be contracted as per ASTA (American Spice Trade Association), ESA (European Spice Association) or ISO Standards
  • Moisture max. 13%
  • Admixture max. 0.10%
  • Vol. Oil min. 2.5cc/100ml or as contracted.

Regency Caraway Seeds are available to order as:

Caraway Seeds 25kg/bag

Habitat: One marked peculiarity about Caraway is that it is indigenous to all parts of Europe, Siberia, Turkey in Asia, Persia, India and North Africa, and yet it is cultivated only in a few comparatively restricted areas. It grows wild in many parts of Canada and the United States, but is nowhere grown there as a field or garden crop. Its cultivation is restricted to relatively small areas in England, Holland, Germany, Finland, Russia, Norway and Morocco, where it constitutes one of the chief agricultural industries within its narrow confines. Holland cultivates the main crop, producing and exporting far larger quantities than any other country. It is cultivated most extensively there in the provinces of Groningen and North Holland, in which more than half the acreage is found. In the whole country about 20,000 acres are devoted to this crop, each acre yielding about 1,000 lb., whereas while Caraway is grown commercially throughout Germany, Austria, France and parts of Spain, the character and amounts produced are very variable, and the yield per acre varies only from 400 to 700 lb., and these countries do not produce much more than they require for home consumption.